Brexit Talks: What Will We Know in Autumn 2018?

The UK’s exit negotiations from the EU will concentrate on separate withdrawal and trade deals, and timing will be a crucial factor, writes Kirsty Hughes. She argues that autumn 2018 will serve as a key period where enough about the UK-EU negotiations will be known and pressure will mount for the constitutional options and implications […]

An Independent Scotland and the EU: What Route to Membership?

In the event of independence, how might Scotland pursue EU membership? Kirsty Hughes and Tobias Lock explore the principal options, arguing that ensuring Scotland’s continuity with EU laws and policy would ultimately be more important than attempting to secure a fast-tracked route to membership, which would be completed in any case after Brexit. Extended Article […]

Will Brexit Mean More Devolution to Scotland?

The return of powers from the EU post-Brexit is often linked to an assumption that there will be consequential further devolution for Scotland, writes Mark Lazarowicz. He questions this view and suggests that the indications from the UK Government are that it may well adopt a more deliberative approach to the transfer of powers from […]

Thin Gruel: The UK Government’s Brexit White Paper

Following the publication of the UK government’s white paper on EU withdrawal, Tobias Lock notes its echoing of previous statements and lack of policy detail. He writes that, while it is to be expected that the negotiations with the EU cannot be completely open, greater clarity on the government’s position would have been preferable. UK’s […]

Brexit and the Future of Local Government in Scotland

In the process of Brexit, local government in Scotland will have specific concerns over funding, legislation and the division of powers, writes Serafin Pazos-Vidal. He argues that, based on the plans from both the Scottish and UK governments, it seems unlikely that Scottish councils will be given meaningful opportunities to contribute to Brexit decision making. […]

In Scotland, the Anniversary of Erasmus is Tempered by Brexit Concerns

The Erasmus programme of educational and cultural exchange has, over its three decades, brought significant benefits to Scotland and the UK, writes Colin Imrie. He argues that the prospect of the UK ending its participation, due to the free movement of people, would be a substantial loss for students, and that the proposed devolution of […]

The Supreme Court in Miller: Some Early Comments

In ruling that parliamentary consent is indeed required before the UK’s EU withdrawal notification, the Supreme Court largely met expectations, writes Tobias Lock. He argues, however, that the Court’s determination that the practice of consulting the devolved legislatures is convention only and not law will have a political impact as the Brexit process develops. Supreme […]

European Disintegration Deserves a More Prominent Place in European Studies

The various challenges facing the European Union and its seeming inability to adequately address them have arguably fuelled European disintegration, rather than integration, writes María del Carmen Sandoval Velasco. She argues that the European studies community should respond by giving European disintegration more attention and seeking to understand its role the evolution of the European […]